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Advice on mixing your own ink (Pigments and binders)

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Advice on mixing your own ink (Pigments and binders)

Postby messenjar » Thu Sep 14, 2006 12:52 pm

Hi everyone I was thinking about buying colour pigments and then binder and then mixing it myself as this seems to work out a lot cheaper than buying premixed water based ink.

Just wondered if any one else does this or has tried this, if so could you tell me the pros and cons or just your experience.

I thought I would ask before I went and bought some.

Cheers
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Postby jklaflin » Thu Sep 14, 2006 2:03 pm

Mixing colors can be done pretty easily, but I recommend first off finding an appropriate color mixing chart that will show the correct proportions for each color... kind of like what paint stores have for mixing paint. I'm sure wherever you buy your pigments/dyes from will have one. Last time I mixed some ink I did it by eye, and it turned out the perfect color, but when I run out I'll have a hard time matching it again! Oh well, that's learning from mistakes! Anyways...

There are several ink companies that will match a needed color for free, though. If you need a small quantity (like a quart or gallon) it would be easier just to order it rather than trying to get set up with all the necessary equipment. Just do a google search (screen printing ink mixing) or something like that and I'm sure you'll find something.
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Postby messenjar » Thu Sep 14, 2006 3:13 pm

thanks alot for the info i will make sure i ask the suppliers for this info,

what do you mean by "get set up with all the necessary equipment"
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Postby jklaflin » Thu Sep 14, 2006 6:11 pm

Necessary equipment meaning all the dyes (usually at least 8 different colors, usually more), air tight dispensers that measure and dispense in micro-liters (or similar measurement), and a couple other miscellaneous mixing tools (spatula for stirring, empty "paint" cans for storing mixed ink, etc...)
Depending on how crazy you want to go, you could easily spend several thousand getting a "professional" setup. Hope this helps!
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Postby X_Autotype_#1 » Mon Sep 18, 2006 8:54 pm

See if you can get your hands on some Manoukian Ecotex P. This is an excellent water base component system that uses a very clean, clear base, and some of the finest pigments around (Manoukian manufacturers automotive pigments in Italy). If the system is available to you in the UK, you won't be sorry.

Cheers!
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Postby f_bomb » Wed Jan 31, 2007 7:36 pm

I dug this one up through a search, rather than posting another, I figured I'd add my question onto this topic...

Can mixing a plastisol color be so simple as to putting some white plastisol in with red plastisol to get pink? I assume it is, but didn't want to waste time and $$$. Somebody wants a short run of pink on black 50/50 tees...I'd rather get some red and mix it rather than buying pink and having it laying around forever...I'll use the red, but pink???
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Postby corradomatt » Thu Feb 01, 2007 12:22 pm

f_bomb,

It's real easy to mix plastisol inks. Just go slow and be careful. I would start with a ton of white ink and slowly mix in red until you get the color your looking for.

We used to mix colors like that all the time in my shop. We even started recording the exact process so we could replicate it when we ran out of that color. It doesn't get you the EXACT color every time but it's damn close! :)
Screen Printing Supplies - Equipment, Ink, Emulsion and more!
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Postby f_bomb » Thu Feb 01, 2007 3:54 pm

Thanks!!! I assumed it would work but, you know what they say about assuming...Thanks for the verification!
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Postby ROADSIDE » Fri Feb 02, 2007 11:55 am

I use 12oz ceramic coffee mugs to mix my inks. you can get about 100 - 200 prints from a cup. Helps prevent over mixing and beats the hell out of disposable cups that break down after a few months. You can cover the coffee cups with some plastic wrap and put them on a shelf until you need them again.
They dont dry out and last LONG LONG time.
.... I can give you my opinion but I can't tell you if it's right or not.
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Postby f_bomb » Fri Feb 02, 2007 6:28 pm

ROADSIDE wrote:I use 12oz ceramic coffee mugs to mix my inks. you can get about 100 - 200 prints from a cup. Helps prevent over mixing and beats the hell out of disposable cups that break down after a few months. You can cover the coffee cups with some plastic wrap and put them on a shelf until you need them again.
They dont dry out and last LONG LONG time.


Great tip!!! Thanks...The dollar store by me has a 12oz. coffee mug with a lid...I hafta go grab some!
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pigments

Postby nils » Fri May 04, 2007 2:56 pm

Offset inks have much-much more pigment inside. Sometimes I use offset inks for adjusting tone of screenprinting ink.
Both are UV inks.
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